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The Tsing Hua Lab Opens for the Seamless Cooperation between University and Enterprise
The Tsing Hua Lab has recently been completed featuring new standards in the areas of earthquake protection, control of micro-vibration, and dust prevention. NTHU President Hocheng Hong pointed out that the Tsing Hua Lab was designed in conjunction with the Innovation Incubation Center completed in 2016. The two buildings are adjacent to each other and connected by walkways, promoting seamless cooperation between the two facilities in solving the latest problems facing industry.
 
President Hocheng said that NTHU is close to the Hsinchu Science Park, the Industrial Technology Research Institute, and the Taiwan Photon Source (TPS) of the National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center (NSRRC), making Hsinchu the core of Taiwan’s high-tech industry. He compared the Tsing Hua Lab and the Innovation Incubation Center to two bright pearls reflecting one another in harmony, linking R&D capability with business startup.
 
A Five-star Laboratory Free of Dust and Resistant to Earthquakes and Vibrations
 
NTHU spent nearly NT$700 million to build the state-of-the-art Lab. Construction began in 2014 at the 8,506-square meter site on Baoshan Road near the south gate. The building has nine stories above ground plus a basement, with a total floor space of ​​15,000 square meters divided into 100 individual laboratories.
 
President Hocheng pointed out that various departments—including Physics, Chemistry, and Chemical Engineering—will be conducting interdisciplinary research at the Tsing Hua Lab, and that the synergy is expected to attract lots of attention.
 
According to Professor Tseng Fan-gang, Vice President for Research and Development, the Center for Nanotechnology, Materials Science, and Microsystems located on the first floor of the Lab is the cleanest laboratory in Taiwan, with a dust-exclusion level of “class 1,000,” ie., within each square foot there are less than 1,000 dust particles larger than 0.5 microns; providing an ideal environment for semiconductor experiments.
 
Moreover, Tsing Hua Lab's anti-micro-vibration standard is also the highest of all its counterparts in Taiwan. The Lab has a vibration criterion of level E, which means that when large trucks pass close by, the precision instruments in the laboratory will not vibrate greater than 125 micro inches in amplitude per second—less than one-twentieth the diameter of a human hair. Furthermore, the Lab was built to withstand a magnitude 7 earthquake.
 
Domestic and Foreign Manufacturers Queued up for Space
 
Tseng also stated that because of the ultra-high specifications of the laboratory and its integrated facilities design, a large number of world-class research institutions are moving in, and currently the occupancy rate is more than 70 percent. For example, the Dutch lithography company Mapper is planning to set up in the Lab a high-volume e-beam direct-write lithography device worth billions of Taiwan dollars, which is only the second of its kind in Asia. The device will be used to develop hacker-proof chips for use in identity cards.
 
"The value of the cutting-edge equipment already installed in the Tsing Hua Lab far exceeds the cost of the building, and the most valuable of all is the brain power of all the researchers who will be working there,” said Tseng.
 
The Delta Power Electronics Research Center will soon be set up on the 2nd floor of the Lab. Also planning to set up research centers in the Lab are the AU Optronics' subsidiary UFresh Technology, the Taiwan branch of Japan’s Floadia Corporation, and several new companies in the fields of chemical materials and semiconductor testing.
 
Tseng further pointed out that four research centers supported by the Ministry of Education will also be established at the Lab: the Brain Research Center, the High-Entropy Materials Research and Development Center, the Frontier Research Center on Fundamental and Applied Sciences of Matters, and the Center for Quantum Technology.
 
Tsing Hua Alumni Doing Their Part
 
Professor Chang Shih-chieh, the deputy director of the Office of Research and Development, said that the fundraising efforts for the Lab got off to a good start when four alumni each donated NT$50 million, the first of whom was Chen Chi-Jen, who completed his Ph.D. in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering in 1989. The other alumni were Li Yifa, Tseng Tzu-Chang, Howard Chen, and Yang Jeng-Rern of the Physics Department; Tsai Jau-Yang and Chang Kang-wei of the Department of Chemical Engineering; and Cheng-Li Lu of the Department of Chemistry.
 
President Hocheng remarked that the we have great buildings, great teachers and great love. The Lab is a testament to the tremendous generosity of Tsing Hua alumni and demonstrates their continuous interest in the university’s future.
 
The preparations and construction of the Lab have gone through four different NTHU presidents: Frank Shu, Chen Wen-tsuen, Chen Lih-juann, and Hocheng Hong. Chen Lih-juann said that the establishment of the Tsing Hua Lab is an important page in the history of the University. He also said that because Frank Shu had previously taught at the Department of Astronomy at the University of California, Berkeley, the Lab’s design borrowed a number of elements from the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Also during Shu’s tenure the Lab’s planning had to be suspended due to lack of funding, and it only got back on track after generous donations came in from NTHU alumni, especially Chen Chi-Jen.
 
Chen Lih-juann also said that the research to be conducted at the Lab will all be at the cutting edge, and that he is looking forward to seeing it become a beehive of activity and a paragon of cooperation between academia and industry.
 
Chen Wen-tsuen pointed out that “cross-disciplinary research is the future.” Although he is a professor of the College of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, he is now also involved in biomedical research related to the development of sensors, demonstrating the interdisciplinary spirit which is sure to play a key role in the future development of the Tsing Hua Lab.
 

NTHU President Hocheng Hong (center) with former NTHU Presidents Chen Lih-juann (left) and Chen Wen-tsuen (right).

NTHU President Hocheng Hong (center) with former NTHU Presidents Chen Lih-juann (left) and Chen Wen-tsuen (right).


At the inauguration ceremony President Hocheng Hong compared the Tsing Hua Lab and the Innovation Incubation Center to two bright pearls reflecting one another in perfect harmony.

At the inauguration ceremony President Hocheng Hong compared the Tsing Hua Lab and the Innovation Incubation Center to two bright pearls reflecting one another in perfect harmony.


The Tsing Hua Lab is practically dust free.

The Tsing Hua Lab is practically dust free.


Nearly NT$700 million was spent building the Lab, about one third of which was donated by alumni, many of whom were on hand for the inauguration ceremony.

Nearly NT$700 million was spent building the Lab, about one third of which was donated by alumni, many of whom were on hand for the inauguration ceremony.


Tsing Hua Lab’s cell sorter analyzes cell gene expression and purifies rare cells.

Tsing Hua Lab’s cell sorter analyzes cell gene expression and purifies rare cells.


The precision instruments in the laboratory never undergo a vibration greater than 125 micro inches in amplitude per second—less than one-twentieth the diameter of a human hair.

The precision instruments in the laboratory never undergo a vibration greater than 125 micro inches in amplitude per second—less than one-twentieth the diameter of a human hair.


The Lab has nine stories above ground plus a basement, and is strategically located nearby related research facilities.

The Lab has nine stories above ground plus a basement, and is strategically located nearby related research facilities.


The Tsing Hua Lab (left) was designed together with the adjacent Innovation Incubation Center, promoting seamless cooperation between the two facilities.

The Tsing Hua Lab (left) was designed together with the adjacent Innovation Incubation Center, promoting seamless cooperation between the two facilities.

 

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