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Women Scientists at NTHU Receive Prestigious Awards
Amongst NTHU’s many outstanding women scientists, two have recently received prestigious awards from the Taiwan Outstanding Women in Science organization. Professor Lily Hui-Ching Wang of the Institute of Molecular and Cellular Biology received the Promising Women in Science Award for her work on the mitosis regulation and the pathology of viral hepatitis. Li-An Chu, a Ph.D. student at the Institute of Biotechnology, won the Meng Tsui-Chu Scholarship for her interdisciplinary work in neuroscience research.
 
Prof. Wang’s main research involves exploring the mitotic regulatory protein associated with cancer formation. Her experiments have shown that the important mitotic regulatory protein Sgo1(Shugoshin-like protein 1) is present in the majority of liver cancers, and thus can be taken as a therapeutic target for future cancer chemotherapy.
 
Prof. Wang is also exploring how viral oncogene proteins respond to cellular mitotic machinery that ultimately leads to cancer. Her studies have shown that inhibition of cytoskeletal proteins may cause adverse effects that activate Epstein-Barr virus in nasopharyngeal carcinoma. These research findings are important information for physicians when choosing chemotherapeutic agents to treat nasopharyngeal carcinoma.
 
After completing her bachelor’s degree at the Department of Power Mechanical Engineering (PME), Li-An Chu developed a keen interest in life sciences, and thus became a member of a research team headed by Dean Ann-Shyn Chiang of the College of Life Science. Applying her expertise in power mechanics, Chu and her coworkers have developed a photoluminescence system—a key element of Chiang’s research on the neural pathways of the fruit fly which was published in Science in 2013.
 
Continuing their work along the same lines, Li-an Chu and her co-workers from PME Department and Institute of Photonics developed a laser tracking system for targeting fruit flies, which received considerable media coverage, including a 2014 report in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. In addition, she teamed up with several students of the PME Department to develop an instrument for classifying tiny insects, which received three patents in Taiwan and one in the USA, as well as the National Innovation Award and the National Technology Innovation Award. Thus even before completing her Ph.D. Chu has made a number of significant contributions to the field of life sciences.
 
The Taiwan Outstanding Women in Science Award, the Promising Women in Science Award, and the Meng Tsui-chu Scholarship are jointly sponsored by L'ORÉAL and the National Women’s League of the R.O.C. The recipients are selected by the Women’s League and the Wu Chien-Shiung Foundation.
 
Four awardees at the 2016 Taiwan Outstanding Women in Science Awards Ceremony (left to right): Professor Lily Hui-Ching Wang of NTHU’s Institute of Molecular and Cellular Biology;Rui-hua Chen of Academia Sincia; Yu-ling Chang of NTU’s Department of Psychology; and Li-an Chuof NTHU’s Institute of Biotechnology.

Four awardees at the 2016 Taiwan Outstanding Women in Science Awards Ceremony (left to right): Professor Lily Hui-Ching Wang of NTHU’s Institute of Molecular and Cellular Biology;Rui-hua Chen of Academia Sincia; Yu-ling Chang of NTU’s Department of Psychology; and Li-an Chuof NTHU’s Institute of Biotechnology.

Associate Professor Lily Hui-Ching Wang with Professor Margaret Chang, Professor Wen-Ching Wang, and members of her research team.

Associate Professor Lily Hui-Ching Wang with Professor Margaret Chang, Professor Wen-Ching Wang, and members of her research team.

 

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