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NTHU’s Latest Green Building
Funded by a generous contribution from alumnus Dr. Brent Wei-teh Lee, the Lee Tsen Min Building was inaugurated on April 24. The building was designed to maximize energy efficiency and will house various research laboratories that focus on the development of the new green-energy technologies, including high-efficiency batteries and wireless solar chargers. Thus the building is said to be “green inside and out.”
 
Named in honor of Dr. Lee's father, this is the first NTHU building named after an individual, and is also known as the "Green Energy Teaching and Research Building." Lee’s donation of NT$150,000,000 was the largest individual endowment ever received by NTHU since it was re-established in Taiwan 60 years ago.
 
At a press conference held on April 22, President Hong Hocheng expressed his gratitude to Dr. Lee for the generous donation as well as his stipulation that the building adopt an energy-efficient design.
 
Dr. Lee responded that he is happy that he is able to give something back to his alma mater, and he hopes that others will follow his example. He also said that he wanted to have the building named after his father as a way of expressing his gratitude to both of his parents, who suffered much hardship after arriving in Taiwan from Shandong along with their children.
 
Construction of the Lee Tsen Min Building began in 2014 and was completed at the end of 2015. It’s now the sixth “green building” on campus, and Dr. Lee hopes that it will inspire students to think and learn in new ways. In particular, the spacious and airy design is naturally appealing and is intended to stimulate collaboration and innovation, in contrast to the cloistered feel of conventional research labs.
 
Ching-hwa Chang, the Principal Architect, stated that energy efficiency and sustainable development were the main design considerations. Thus the design features an attractive white curtain wall on the east and west sides of the building which allows light and air in, but blocks direct sunlight, thereby reducing air-conditioning costs by around 70 percent.
 
Chang stated that the building further reduces the need for air conditioning by using high ceilings and making maximum use of natural ventilation. Moreover, in the future the building will be fitted with an energy management system designed by the Department of Engineering which is expected to reduce the combined annual electricity expenses of this building and the Engineering Building substantially.
 
The Lee Tsen Min Building, also known as the

The Lee Tsen Min Building, also known as the "Green Energy Teaching and Research Building."

From left to right: Shu-gang Liu, general manager of Best-giving Construction; Fan-Gang Tseng, Dean of the College of Nuclear Science; President Hong Hocheng; Dr. Brent Wei-teh Lee; Ching-hwa Chang, the Principal Architect; and Min Lee, Vice President and Chief of Staff of NTHU.

From left to right: Shu-gang Liu, general manager of Best-giving Construction; Fan-Gang Tseng, Dean of the College of Nuclear Science; President Hong Hocheng; Dr. Brent Wei-teh Lee; Ching-hwa Chang, the Principal Architect; and Min Lee, Vice President and Chief of Staff of NTHU.

The Lee Tsen Min Building features an attractive white curtain wall which allows light and air in while blocking direct sunlight, thereby reducing air-conditioning costs by around 70 percent.

The Lee Tsen Min Building features an attractive white curtain wall which allows light and air in while blocking direct sunlight, thereby reducing air-conditioning costs by around 70 percent.

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