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Three NTHU Faculty Members Won MOE’s National Chair Professorship
The Ministry of Education announced the nine recipients of the 20th National Chair Professorship, amongst them are three faculty members of NTHU: Professors Wang Sue-Lein of the Department of Chemistry, Kwo J. Ray-nien of the Department of Physics, and Chang Cheng-shang of the .
 
Wang Sue-Lein: Breakthroughs in the Fluorescence Properties and the Synthesis of Crystalline Nanoporous Inorganic Framework Materials
 
After receiving her doctorate in chemistry at Iowa State University in 1985, Wang completed her postdoctoral research at the Exxon Company and returned to teach at NTHU’s Department of Chemistry in 1986. Wang's research expertise is nanoporous inorganic framework solids; she has made numerous breakthroughs and demonstrated great impact in leading research in the field of crystalline porous materials. This is the second time that Prof. Wang won the National Chair Professorship.
 
Wang’s laboratory is using mild hydrothermal methods with varied solvent systems, including deep eutectic solvents, to explore novel intra-crystalline nanoporous solids to elucidate structure-property relationships. Her work is widely respected across the synthetic porous solids community as being of the highest quality. Her major contributions are: (1) discovery of activator-free porous solids to emit intense photoluminescence to launch unprecedented lanthanide-free phosphor materials for LED devices; and (2) unearthed the very first crystalline mesoporous structure and achieving rational design synthesis of crystalline channels using surfactant-type templates, which is a long-standing challenging problem in the field of porous materials science, but it has long been hampered by misconceptions.
 
Wang has published nearly three hundred SCI journal papers and holds six patents on phosphor materials; her many breakthroughs in the field have greatly enhanced the academic reputation of NTHU and Taiwan. In her acceptance speech, Prof. Wang said that she is very grateful to her students for their creativity and prudent attitude in research, she looks forward to more innovations in practically useful novel porous materials.
 
Kwo J. Raynien: Passion for Knowledge, Striving for Excellence, and Lifelong Learning
 
Prof. Kwo’s research work centers on novel thin film materials via the inventions of advanced thin growth techniques, and explorations of their unique physical properties for potential applications in nanoelectronics, superconductivity and spintronics. From 1981 to 2003 she has engaged in fundamental forefront physics research at the world renowned Bell Labs, New Jersey, United States, during which time she received worldwide recognitions for a series of groundbreaking discoveries and innovations. In 2003, Kwo returned to Taiwan with her husband, Professor Minghwei Hong, and was appointed as a Distinguished Chair Professor at NTHU in 2008. Currently she serves as the Vice President of Research and Development at NTHU.
 
Kwo specializes in experimental condensed-state physics over forty years. She has invented molecular epitaxy techniques for metals and oxide thin films. Her research interests are broad, spanning from magnetronics, superconductivity, nanoelectronics, to spintronics. After returning to Taiwan, she has established a world class nanoelectronics research team and successfully developed the next-generation, high-mobility channel transistors, thereby making Taiwan one of the leading players in global nanotechnology realm. About four years ago she turned her attention to the emerging field of low dimensional quantum matter physics, a brand new field that is expected to revolutionize the future of science and technology through research and development of new areas such as spintronics and quantum computing.
 
Kwo also spent much of her efforts to exhort young students and encouraged them: “Have passion for what you are studying, stick with it for a good period of time, then for sure you will be able to achieve good results.” She also attaches great importance to the development of characters, and often encourages her students to reflect deeply on the purpose of seeking advanced educations, why they are studying physics, what are their goals, and the true meanings of life.
 
In accepting this award Prof. Kwo said, "I am very grateful to my husband who gives me strong supports unselfishly." She also thanked her colleagues at NTHU for their encouragement and helps. Finally, she expressed thanks to all the members of her research team, especially her bright and cheerful students, stating that "It has been a great joy for me to accompany them in their journey to mature into good scientists."
 
Chang Cheng-Shang: At the Vanguard of High-speed Internet Research
 
After completing his Ph.D. in electrical engineering at Columbia University in 1989, Prof. Chang worked at the IBM Watson Research Center for 4 years, conducting research in the stochastic majorization theory, for which he received IBM’s Outstanding Innovation Award in 1992. During that time he also conducted research in the effective bandwidth theory, and succeeded in solving one of the most difficult problems hampering the early development of the Internet—stochastic quality of service.
 
In August 1993 Chang joined NTHU, and in 1997 he put forth his system theory on networks, which later became the cornerstone of communication network analysis. In 1999 he commenced research on high-speed switches, resulting in the development of the series of Birkhoff-von Neumann switches, which have opened up new research directions for high-speed switches.
 
In 2008, the work of Chang's research team was included in the National Science Council’s list of the 50 most significant scientific achievements of modern times, in recognition of his outstanding contributions to the field of high-speed switching technology. In 2011 he received the Ministry of Education’s Academic Award. When presented with the National Chair Professorship, Dr. Chang stated, "I would like to thank NTHU and the Ministry of Science and Technology for their support and encouragement. I’m also grateful for all the invaluable help and inspiration I’ve received from my research team.”
 
Professor Wang Sue-Lein.

Professor Wang Sue-Lein.

Professor Kwo J. Raynien.

Professor Kwo J. Raynien.

Professor Chang Cheng-shang.

Professor Chang Cheng-shang.

 

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