Your browser does not support JavaScript!

:::

 

 

NTHU Presented Four Papers at the ISSCC
Faculty members and students of the Department of Electrical Engineering presented four papers on the usage of critical memory wafers in artificial intelligence (AI) at the 2018 International Solid-State Circuits Conference (ISSCC) held on February 11-15 in San Francisco—the highest number of papers of all EE departments in Taiwan and the sixth highest in the world, a distinction shared with the Department of Electrical Engineering at the University of California, Berkeley.
 
The Memory Design Lab led by Prof. Chang Meng-Fan of the Department of Electrical Engineering presented three papers, in comparison to one paper each presented by its counterparts at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Stanford University, and the University of Illinois.
 
The Department of Electrical Engineering has four different research laboratories developing computer circuits in non-volatile memory suitable for use in AI. These labs are led by Professors Tang Kea Tiong, Hsieh Chih-cheng, Liu Ren-shuo, and Chang Meng-Fan. Two of their research papers were presented at the ISSCC.
 
"Non-volatile memory" refers to digital data that doesn’t disappear when the current is turned off, and is now widely used in portable electronic products. According to Prof. Chang, in the past memory didn’t need to have computing power, but memory which can simultaneously handle storage and computing is crucial to the development of next generation artificial intelligence. Prof. Chang explains that integrating the computer circuit into the memory allows the chips to simultaneously store data and carry out computing functions, thereby improving processing efficiency and saving energy, which is vital to the future development of AI products. For example, if a particular unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) can currently fly for 6 to 10 minutes, when this kind of new computing chip is used to reduce its power consumption, it will be able to fly for about 60 minutes.
 
Together with TSMC, Prof. Chang’s team has designed and produced a spin-transfer torque magnetic RAM (STT-MRAM) chip which is the fastest one ever made, and is likely to become the next generation of memory material. Their research paper was presented at the ISSCC.
 
By improving the technology used for capacitor array slicing and multiple sampling, Prof. Hsieh’s team has successfully translated sound, light, and smell into digital signals that allow online shoppers to sample the products they are interested in buying. Their research paper was presented at the ISSCC.
 
According to Chang, as the premier showcase for the latest advances in IC technology, the ISSCC gives priority to papers presenting new technologies which are in or near the production stage; thus his team’s cooperation with TSMC was especially important. Doctoral student Chen Wei-How, a member of Chang’s research team, smilingly recalls how in the final stage of the project they were getting less than 6 hours of sleep each night, and that only by mutual encouragement were they able to carry through to the finish line.
 
Chang says that in response to the increasing importance of AI, his department has begun to offer a number of related courses, including Deep Learning, Big Data Analysis, Machine Intelligence, High-performance Computer Operation, and IC Chip Design in recent years.
 
Taiwanese researchers presented a total of 16 papers at the ISSCC; the only countries presenting more papers are the United States and South Korea. Among these 16, 9 are from academia (4 from NTHU, 3 from National Chiao Tung University, and 1 each from National Taiwan University and ), and 7 from industry (3 from MediaTek, 3 from TSMC, and 1 from eMemory Technology.
 
The ISSCC is sponsored by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE). With a history of 65 years, it is the foremost global forum for presentation of advances in solid-state circuits and systems-on-a-chip.
 

NTHU’s Department of Electrical Engineering presented four papers at the 2018 ISSCC, the sixth highest in the world, a distinction shared with the Department of Electrical Engineering at the University of California, Berkeley.

NTHU’s Department of Electrical Engineering presented four papers at the 2018 ISSCC, the sixth highest in the world, a distinction shared with the Department of Electrical Engineering at the University of California, Berkeley.


From left: Prof. Liu Ren-shuo, Prof. Hsieh Chih-cheng, Prof. Chang Meng-Fan, and Prof. Tang Kea Tiong.

From left: Prof. Liu Ren-shuo, Prof. Hsieh Chih-cheng, Prof. Chang Meng-Fan, and Prof. Tang Kea Tiong.

 

No. of visitors