Your browser does not support JavaScript!

:::

中文版    
 

 

AIT Chairman Moriarty Urges Students to Take Pride in Taiwan
On November 7th Ambassador James F. Moriarty, Chairman of the American Institute in Taiwan (AIT), visited NTHU and gave a speech on the topic of US–Taiwan Relations. Nearly 100 faculty members, students, and alumni were in attendance, and after the talk there was a lively question-and-answer session. With his candid language and charming style, Moriarty quickly captured the hearts of the entire audience, and following the discussion session joked with the many students who came forth to take selfies with him.
 
Moriarty said that he has been a diplomat for 36 years, and that in retrospect, he can't think of anything else he would rather be doing than serving his country in an important front-line position. When Chuang Yu-ching, a freshman in the College of Humanities and Social Sciences, asked how to best prepare for a career in diplomacy, Moriarty replied that making a meaningful contribution to Taiwan begins with being proud of Taiwan.
 
Moriarty also gave three suggestions to the students present: study hard, be straightforward and sincere, and enjoy life. The questions raised by the audience included US-Taiwan relations, US-China relations, Indo-Taiwan relations, Indo-Pacific strategic partnerships, trade disputes, and mid-term elections in the United States.
 
After greeting the audience in fluent Mandarin, Moriarty began by saying that Hsinchu is Taiwan's most important science and technology hub and that NTHU represents the future of technology in Taiwan. Therefore an important part of his role as chairman of AIT is to maintain a sustained dialogue with NTHU on the future of US-Taiwan science and technology relations.
 
Moriarty also affirmed Taiwan’s role in the United States’ Indo-Pacific strategy and stated that he believes that the spirit of freedom and equality is the greatest strength of Taiwan. As for the U.S. mid-term elections, he said that both parties in the United States recognize the potential threat posed by the rising power of China, so the long-standing U.S. policy on Taiwan won’t be affected by the results of the mid-term elections.
 
After the talk, NTHU president Hocheng Hong thanked Moriarty for his engaging speech and gave him a bottle of plum wine and a bronze commemorative plaque printed with NTHU logo.
 
Upon learning that Moriarty would be speaking at NTHU, more than a dozen students from the NTHU Global Program residential college prepared some questions by initiating a discussion group on the role of the United States in the global political economy, the future development of US-China trade and economics, and the political relationship among Taiwan, the U.S., China, and Japan. One of NTHU’s four residential colleges, the Global Program is dedicated to cultivating students' international outlook and their ability to participate in international affairs.
 
Another group of students who posed questions after the talk was a discussion group studying Indo-Pacific defense strategy under the guidance of Prof. Fang Tien-sze of the Center for General Education.
 
NTHU alumnus Shih Ta-ching played an important role in organizing this special lecture. He encouraged all the students present to make the most of this rare opportunity to interact with a career diplomat face-to-face.
 
Lin Hsin-ting, a sophomore in the College of Humanities and Social Sciences, said that she was impressed by Moriarty’s advice to take pride in Taiwan, and said that being able to attend a talk by such an important official and to ask questions has been an invaluable experience.
 
Wei Yi-Ching, a freshman of the Hsinchu College of Education, said that listening to this speech has deepened her understanding of the relationship between the United States, China, and Taiwan, and that she was quite impressed with Moriarty’s calm demeanor in answering questions.
 

On November 7th AIT Chairman James F. Moriarty gave a speech at NTHU on US–Taiwan Relations.

On November 7th AIT Chairman James F. Moriarty gave a speech at NTHU on US–Taiwan Relations.


NTHU president Hocheng Hong presenting Moriarty with a bronze commemorative plaque.

NTHU president Hocheng Hong presenting Moriarty with a bronze commemorative plaque.


Moriarty speaking on US–Taiwan Relations.

Moriarty speaking on US–Taiwan Relations.


Students chatting with Moriarty after his talk.

Students chatting with Moriarty after his talk.


After the talk lots of students came forward for selfies with Moriarty and Hocheng.

After the talk lots of students came forward for selfies with Moriarty and Hocheng.


Moriarty gave an engaging talk on US–Taiwan Relations.

Moriarty gave an engaging talk on US–Taiwan Relations.

 

No. of visitors