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Leaving No Stone Unturned: Two NTHU Faculty Members Elected Academicians at Academia Sinica
On July 4 Academia Sinica published a list of newly elected Academicians, and two NTHU faculty members were included: Ann-Shyn Chiang of the Institute of Biotechnology, and Cheng-Hwa Tsang of the Institute of Anthropology. Professors Chiang and Tsang were felicitated at a reception held at NTHU on July 11. Among the many notable guests were Academicians Wu Chao, Lih J. Chen and Yi-Long Huang, and Professor Emeritus Shih-Lin Chang.
 
In his address President Hocheng said that the outstanding research of Professors Chiang and Tsang demonstrates the three pillars of academic excellence at NTHU: significance, scope, and perseverance. As for significance, both Chiang and Tsang have selected research topics which are important and unique. In terms of scope, both have assembled large, interdisciplinary research teams. When it comes to perseverance, both are highly dedicated to their research and have the patience to carry out a project over a long period of time.
 
In his speech Chiang said that although he is not a graduate of NTHU, he decided to join the newly established Institute of Biotechnology because he admires NTHU's spirit and forward-looking approach to research. At that time most researchers in his field were probing into the secrets of genetic sequences, but Chiang decided to conduct research on the neural pathways of fruit flies. Despite a lot of ups and downs, his research has already yielded significant results.
 
Because he was conducting excavation on Green Island, Prof. Tsang was unable to attend the reception, but was able to address the assembly via telephone. He stated that NTHU is the leading school in Taiwan in the field of anthropology, since professor Yih Yuan Li joined the faculty and established the college of Humanities & Social Science. He also indicated that, as an archeologist he often recalls the words of Hu Shi: "Let your search take you to the ends of the earth." Despite the difficulty of traveling to and working in remote locations, for Tsang the joy of discovery makes it worthwhile.
 
Prof. Chiang is well known around the world for his contributions to the fields of neuroanatomy and genetics. As a youth he was so moved the first time he viewed living tissue under a microscope that he decided to pursue a career in the biological sciences. After many years of hard work he has received a number of awards for his groundbreaking research on the memory and neural network of fruit flies.
 
Chiang is the first researcher to completely map out the neural pathways of the fruit fly, for which purpose he invented an anatomic tissue-clearing solution for high-resolution 3D confocal imaging of thick biological samples. Since 2007, in addition to mapping the neural pathways used to transmit olfactory and aural information in the tiny brain of the fruit fly, his research team has also discovered the neural cells the fruit fly uses to store medium- and long-term memory.
 
A noted authority on archeology, Tsang has made major contributions to our understanding of the prehistoric cultures of Taiwan. Moreover, Tsang organized Taiwan's first underwater archeological team, with which he has already conducted investigations in Penghu, Anping, Green Island, and the Dongsha Atoll, resulting in the identification of around 80 shipwrecks.
 
When ancient artefacts were discovered during the construction of the Tainan Science Park in 1994, work was halted so that an archeological team led by Prof. Tsang could conduct an investigation. In what turned out to be one of the longest and most significant archeological projects in the history of Taiwan, his team unearthed a large number of artefacts which have shed considerable light on the prehistory of Taiwan, Southeast Asia, and the Pacific Islands.
 
With his seemingly inexhaustible zeal for discovery and exploration, Prof. Tsang is currently supervising archeological fieldwork on the wreck of a Spanish merchant ship near Green Island, as well as a dig at a Paleolithic site in Taidong's Changbin Township.
 
Professor Ann-Shyn Chiang is well known around the world for his work in neuroanatomy and behavioral genetics.

Professor Ann-Shyn Chiang is well known around the world for his work in neuroanatomy and behavioral genetics.

From left to right: Academicians Yi-Long Huang, Lih J. Chen, Ann-Shyn Chiang, President Hong Hocheng, Academician Wu Chao, and Prof. Emeritus Shih-Lin Chang.

From left to right: Academicians Yi-Long Huang, Lih J. Chen, Ann-Shyn Chiang, President Hong Hocheng, Academician Wu Chao, and Prof. Emeritus Shih-Lin Chang.

Professor Cheng-Hwa Tsang (wearing white), a noted authority on archeology and the prehistoric cultures of Taiwan, with his underwater research team researching a shipwreck in Penghu.

Professor Cheng-Hwa Tsang (wearing white), a noted authority on archeology and the prehistoric cultures of Taiwan, with his underwater research team researching a shipwreck in Penghu.

 

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