Your browser does not support JavaScript!

:::

 

 

Research in Two-dimensional Materials at NTHU Gains International Spotlight
During the past year a research team headed by Professor Albert Yi-Hsien Lee of the Department of Material Sciences and Engineering has had its findings on two-dimensional semiconductor materials published in three leading journals. Furthermore, in recognition of the significant contribution they have made, the team was invited to present their findings at the March 2015 meeting of the American Physical Society. Such rare achievements have brought considerable international attention to the materials research program at NTHU.
 
According to Dr. Lee, research in two-dimensional materials has grown rapidly in recent years, as demonstrated by the 2010 Nobel Prize in Physics being awarded to Andre Geim and Konstantin Novoselov for their groundbreaking experiments regarding the two-dimensional material graphene. Moreover, since the success of much research and development depends on the availability of suitable materials, the field of two-dimensional materials is becoming increasingly important in both science and industry. A graduate of NTHU, Lee decided to return to his alma mater to teach and to establish an international research team to develop two-dimensional materials.
 
Prof. Lee’s research team is unique. Most of the team members are undergraduate students, They, however, have succeeded in developing a wide variety of two-dimensional materials and synthetic crystalline materials. Recently the team has developed a monocrystalline with a level heterogeneous structure, thereby opening a new chapter in the history of the components utilized in nanometer photoelectricity. Their research on this topic has been published in the January issue of Nano Letters.
 
Working in cooperation with the Physics Department at the City University of New York, undergraduate team member Lin Erh-Chen developed a process for the fabrication and transfer of special materials and then used it to combine two-dimensional semiconductor material with an optic resonance microcavity. This was the first time the excitons of photons and two-dimensional materials have been observed coupling at below room temperature. Referred to as “microcavity polaritions,” these coupling particles have a Rabi splitting energy which exceeds 46 meV. The success of the research relied on the purity of the surface used and the high quality of the crystals, and the results will make it possible to develop a new generation of lasers and illumination devices. Working in cooperation with a team of optics researchers with no previous experience in two-dimensional materials, the NTHU team succeeded in charting new territory in the field of photoelectricity. Their research has been published in the January issue of Nature Photonics.
 
Working with an optics team from the Department of Physics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), the NTHU team made use of the strong spin inherent in the coupling of two-dimensional materials and combined the precision control of an ultrafast laser with the Stark effect to discover that in a superfast optics system only at ultra-low temperatures is it possible to observe the particles of the III-V group of materials, including excitons, trions, and high-index excitons. The results, which have already inspired a considerable amount of follow-up research, made front page news at MIT and were featured in the March issue of the prestigious journal Nature Materials—the first time a research group from Taiwan has received such recognition.
 
By investing a considerable amount of resources in training and promoting international cooperation, NTHU’s Two-dimensional Materials Research Team has not only greatly enhanced the international profile of scientific research in Taiwan, but has also become a fine example of how NTHU students gain the skills and experience they need to succeed in today’s highly competitive international environment.
 
The latest findings of a research team headed by Professor Albert Yi-Hsien Lee, Department of Material Sciences and Engineering, have been published in the March issue of Nature Materials.

The latest findings of a research team headed by Professor Albert Yi-Hsien Lee, Department of Material Sciences and Engineering, have been published in the March issue of Nature Materials.

Professor Lee (sixth from the left) with his research team.

Professor Lee (sixth from the left) with his research team.

 Professor Lee’s proud and happy team members.

Professor Lee’s proud and happy team members.

 

No. of visitors