Your browser does not support JavaScript!

:::

 

 

Tang Prize Laureate Albie Sachs Visited NTHU and Recounted the Struggle in South Africa
On April 30 Albie Sachs, a former Justice of the Constitutional Court of South Africa and winner of the first Tang Prize in Rule of Law, visited National Tsing Hua University and gave a talk at the International Conference Center. In his talk, titled “Nelson Mandela, from a Lawbreaker to a Lawmaker,” Sachs spoke on the importance of human dignity and human rights, and also recounted his association with Mandela and their long struggle on the road to freedom.
 
Following the welcoming address by Senior Vice Chancellor Lin Sheng-Fen, Dr. Raymond Chen-En Sung of the Tang Prize Foundation provided an introduction in which he lauded Sachs’ commitment and important contributions to human right, equality, justice, and the rule of law.
 
Sachs began his talk with a laudatory recollection of Mandela and the sweeping changes he presided over in South Africa. He then described the severe racial segregation and inequality in the 1950s, as well as the government censorship of the media. It was in such an environment that Mandela joined the African National Congress (ANC) and began his lifelong struggle to bring racial justice and equality to South Africa. Sachs also recounted how countless numbers of people who actively opposed apartheid in South Africa were oppressed, imprisoned, and assassinated.
 
Having been under foreign rule and martial law for most of the twentieth century, Taiwan has also had a long struggle for justice and democracy. After Sachs’ talk, a panel of NTHU junior faculty including Professors Huang Chu-Cheng, Lin Yun-Hsien, and Chen Chung-Lin presented a forum where they discussed Taiwan’s experience in the promotion of human rights, gender equality, and same-sex marriage.
 
When the floor was opened for questions, a student asked Sachs if he had any regrets about all the sacrifices he made in order to hold fast to his ideals. Sachs replied by pointing out that the most important things in life can’t be purchased with money, and encouraged students to listen to their inner voice when making important career decisions.
 
Dr. Samuel Yin, chairman of the Ruentex Financial Group, established the Tang Prize in December 2012 to recognize distinguished individuals and groups working in the fields of sustainable development, biopharmaceutical science, sinology, and rule of law. Intended to serve as the Asian equivalent of the Nobel Prize, the Tang Prize is truly global in reach, with laureates selected on the basis of the originality of their work along with their contributions to society. Rooted in the long-standing cultural traditions of Chinese philosophical thinking, the Tang Prize aims to bring about positive change to the global community and to create a brighter future for all humanity.
 
NTHU President Hong Hocheng (second from right) presenting Albie Sachs with a copy of the NTHU school motto: Self-discipline and social commitment.

NTHU President Hong Hocheng (second from right) presenting Albie Sachs with a copy of the NTHU school motto: Self-discipline and social commitment.

Sachs recounting the human rights struggle in South Africa.

Sachs recounting the human rights struggle in South Africa.

 Group photo.

Group photo.

Sachs autographing copies of his books.

Sachs autographing copies of his books.

No. of visitors