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NTHU alumnus Sow-Hsin Chen Wins the 2015 Guinier Prize
NTHU alumnus Sow-Hsin Chen has been awarded the 2015 Guinier Prize. Sponsored by the International Union of Crystallography (IUCr), the Guinier Prize recognizes lifetime achievement, a major breakthrough, or an outstanding contribution to the field of small-angle scattering (SAS).
 
Dr. Chen presented a Guinier lecture on September 17, 2015 at the 16th International Conference on Small-Angle Scattering in Berlin. At the conference banquet on the same day he received the Guinier prize from Professor Jill Trewhella, chair of the IUCr Small-Angle Scattering Commission, and Professor Peter Frazel, chair of the 2015 SAS conference.
 
Small-angle scattering is one of the main methods for studying nanomaterials, including colloids, polymer materials, biological materials (proteins, DNA and cell membranes), and nanoparticles. Small-angle scattering technique was first developed by French physicist Guinier in 1938. The Guinier prize was established in 2002 by the IUCr to commemorate his contributions to the field, and it has become the highest academic honor in the field of small-angle scattering. Every three years the Guinier Prize is awarded at the International Conference on Small-Angle Scattering to a distinguished researcher.
 
In her introduction, Prof. Trewhella praised Chen’s many contributions to the field over the course of five decades. She lauded Chen’s many original contributions to the study of soft condensed-matter, colloids, complex fluids, and and quasi-elastic scattering. She also mentioned that Chen has authored over 450 papers and several monographs and books. Finally, she pointed out that Chen has trained over 45 doctoral students, many of whom are now teaching and conducting researches on small-angle scattering at institutions throughout the world.
 
When NTHU was re-established in Taiwan in 1956, Chen was amongst the very first batch of students admitted to the Institute of Nuclear Science. Upon completing his master’s degree in 1958 he was awarded a scholarship from the United Nations International Atomic Energy Agency to study in the United States. He obtained a master's degree in nuclear science from the University of Michigan and a doctorate in physics from McMaster University in Canada. His doctoral thesis advisor at McMaster was Prof. B.N. Brockhouse, who later received the Nobel Prize in Physics for his research on neutron scattering.
 
Prof. Chen has received numerous awards for his contributions in the field of neutron scattering, including the 2008 Clifford G. Shull Prize from the Neutron Scattering Society of America for his “seminal contributions to understanding the dynamical properties of supercooled and interfacial water using neutron scattering techniques.” In 2006, Chen received NTHU’s Outstanding Alumni Award, and for many years he has been a consultant to the College of Nuclear Science. Chen’s many contributions to NTHU include providing an endowment to establish the “Sow-Hsin Chen Distinguished Lecture Series on Neutron Science and Technology” and assisting with the development of neutron and synchrotron X-ray scattering at NTHU.
 
 Dr. Chen Sow-hsin, recipient of the 2015 Guinier Prize awarded by the International Union of Crystallography.

Dr. Chen Sow-hsin, recipient of the 2015 Guinier Prize awarded by the International Union of Crystallography.

 Dr. Chen Receiving the 2015 Guinier Prize at the 16th International Conference on Small-Angle Scattering in Berlin.

Dr. Chen Receiving the 2015 Guinier Prize at the 16th International Conference on Small-Angle Scattering in Berlin.

 Dr. Chen (center) with Professor Jill Trewhella (left), chair of the IUCr Small-Angle Scattering Commission, and Professor Gradzielski (right).

Dr. Chen (center) with Professor Jill Trewhella (left), chair of the IUCr Small-Angle Scattering Commission, and Professor Gradzielski (right).

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